Choosing A Racing Helmet

We all know that the head is a very important part of the body. The slightest damage to it, can cause life changing trauma and even death. This is what makes a racing helmet your first and most important piece of racing safety equipment, when it comes to list of industrial components a racing crash. No matter where you’re racing; dirt track, circle track, asphalt speedway, you’re driving fast. Racing speeds can and will result int serious injury without correct safety equipment and protection. Here some ways to protect your head.
1.Learn the minimum safety rules and requirements for the tracks you are racing at. Then go above and beyond them. Take time to research from other sites and racing safety equipment distributors. Following a tracks minimum requirements is dangerous. Those safety minimums are to protect them legally, not you.
2. Look for the Snell certification. The Snell Foundation is a non-profit group that tests and certifies all types of auto racing helmets. They hold different standards for different helmets. They do tests on the chin bar, penetration, how are factory machines made face shield/visor penetration, fire resistance and more. If they don’t carry this certification, don’t buy it! If a maker of helmet does not take the time and money to get the certification, they are not trustworthy!
3. Make sure your Snell certified helmet, is only being used for the correct usage it is certified for! For example, oval track helmets must be flame retardant in case of an in-cockpit fire but motorcycle helmets may not be. Know what it is certified for, and never misuse the wrong helmet, for the wrong race! It can be just as dangerous as going without a helmet.
4. For safe and stylish helmets, check out Impact helmets, Bell helmets or Zeronine helmets. You can even have the custom painted, to suit your individual taste!
5. Order your helmet to fit properly! Use sizing charts from the person you are ordering from, for that helmet only. Once your helmet is on and chin straps are tight, you should not be able to remove or move helmet backwards far enough to expose your nose, not matter how hard you try. Use a lot of force, since you are using this in a high impact sport. If you can, it’s too big. Try a smaller size.
6.Be sure the helmet can be worn with a head and neck restraint. Even if you don’t wear a one to protect your neck now, they are becoming mandatory at many tracks. You don’t want to buy it and then have to replace it in a year. Talk to the shop about installing the anchors. Even if you don’t have one, you are likely to want one at some point.
7. Take careful care of your helmet. Do not store it in high temperatures or moist places. Keep it in it’s bag when not in use.

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